History

Massachusetts enacted legislation in 2000, section 428 of Chapter 159 of the Acts of 2000 (see below for text extract of section 428), establishing that a cardiac care quality advisory commission “develop standards and criteria to be used by the department of public health for the purpose of collecting, monitoring and validating patient specific outcome data for all hospitals in the commonwealth that perform open heart surgery or angioplasty.” Following a 2001 report filed by the Massachusetts Cardiac Care Quality Commission, the State legislature mandated the Massachusetts Department of Public Health collect patient specific outcome data, and evaluate all surgery and angioplasty programs in the Commonwealth.

Regulations were passed in April 2002 requiring all Massachusetts hospitals providing cardiac surgery and/or angioplasty to collect patient data using the Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS) National Cardiac Surgery Database Instrument, in the case of cardiac surgery, and the American College of Cardiology’s National Cardiovascular Data Registry (ACC-NCDR) Instrument, in the case of coronary intervention procedures. All data are submitted electronically to the Massachusetts Data Analysis Center (Mass-DAC), the data-coordinating center that is under the direction of Sharon-Lise Normand and located in the Department of Health Care Policy at Harvard Medical School. Mass-DAC is advised by an external Cardiac Advisory Committee. In addition to the data submissions to Mass-DAC, hospitals are required to submit data to the national STS and ACC data registries. Implementation of data collection for cardiac surgery began January 1, 2002. Implementation of data collection for coronary interventions using the ACC-NCDR Instrument began April 1, 2003.

Massachusetts Session Law 2000, Chapter 159, Section 428.

There is hereby established a cardiac care quality advisory commission to develop standards and criteria to be used by the department of public health for the purpose of collecting, monitoring and validating patient specific outcome data from all hospitals in the commonwealth that perform open heart surgery or angioplasty. The commission shall be comprised of the following five members to be appointed by the commissioner of said department: two cardiac surgeons to be appointed in consultation with the Massachusetts chapter of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons, two cardiologists to be appointed in consultation with the Massachusetts chapter of the American College of Cardiology; and one person to be appointed from a graduate school of medicine or public health with expertise in biostatistical data and the collection and validation of clinical outcome data. The members shall elect a chair. The commission shall consider, among other things, (i) the types of data that should be collected from said hospitals, (ii) the types of outcomes to be reported including operative mortality rates, (iii) the form of reporting such data, (iv) the design and implementation of a system to validating all such data to ensure its accuracy and reliability, (iv) national standards for data collection and validation, and (v) open heart surgery and angioplasty data collection and validation methods used in other states, including the state of New York. The commission shall evaluate methods of obtaining similar such data in order to establish a baseline comparison to be used by said department in evaluating open heart surgery and angioplasy programs conducted at said hospitals. The commission shall prepare a report of its findings and recommendation for the development and methods of financing any such data collection and validation program and shall file a copy of said report with the department of public health, the chairs of the senate and house committees on ways and means and the joint committee on health care no later than March 1, 2001.